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臺北市立大學 藝術治療碩士學位學程

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客座教授

藝術治療學程歷年客座教授

MARCIA L. ROSAL

最高學歷:1986 PhD in Educational Psychology, University of Queensland

個人專長:藝術治療、藝術治療教學、藝術治療督導、藝術治療研究
        1995 Qualified for Board Certification, Art Therapy Credentials Board
        1995-1998 Consultant, Expressive Therapies Department, Kosair Children
s Hospital

E-mailmrosal@fsu.edu

 

九十七學年客座外教授 MARCIA L. ROSAL基本資料

CURRICULUM VITAE

MARCIA L. ROSAL, PhD, ATR-BC

 

Qualifications

1995       Qualified for Board Certification, Art Therapy Credentials Board

1986        PhD in Educational Psychology, University of Queensland

1979        Qualified as a Registered Art Therapist, American Art Therapy Association

1977        MA in Art Therapy, University of Louisville

1973        BS in Art Education, Pennsylvania State University

 

Professional Experience

Academic

1999-present    Professor & Chairperson, Art Education/Art Therapy Department,

Florida State University

2000                Scholar-In-Residence, Illinois State University

1985-1998       Professor, Expressive Therapies Program, University of Louisville

1994, 1998,     Visiting Faculty, Illinois State University

1982-1985       Research Fellow, Schonell Educational Research Center, University of Queensland

1979-1981       Assistant Professor, Art Therapy Studies, State University College at Buffalo

Clinical

1995-1998              Consultant, Expressive Therapies Department, Kosair Children’s Hospital

1986-1998              Art Therapist, Private Practice, Louisville, KY

1981-1983              Art Therapist, East Baton Rouge Parish Schools, Louisiana

1978-1979              Art Therapist, Tulane Medical Center Hospital

1977-1978              Art Therapist, East Louisiana State Hospital

 

Service to Professional Associations

2006-2008                   Treasurer, National Coalition of Creative Arts Therapies

Associations

2005-2007               Nominating Committee, American Art Therapy Association

1999-2001                                      President, American Art Therapy Association

1997-1999               President-Elect, American Art Therapy Association

1993-1997                                      Director, American Art Therapy Association National Board

1987-1993               Education and Training Board, American

Art Therapy Association, Chair 1991-1993

 

Editorial Positions

1991-Present    Editorial Board Member of The Arts in Psychotherapy:  An International

                Journal

1990-1993              Editorial Board Member of Art Therapy:  Journal of the American Art

Therapy Association

 

Refereed Publications

Rosal, M.L. (2006).  Opening the doors of art museums for therapeutic processes.  The

Arts in Psychotherapy, 33(4), 288-301 with C. Brown-Treadon and V. Thompson-

Wylder.

Rosal, M.L. (2006).  Book review: Aggression and depression assessed through art by R.

Silver, Art therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 23(3), 147-148.

Rosal, M.L. (2006).  Video review:  Art therapy has many faces by J. Rubin, The Arts in

Psychotherapy, 33(2), 148.

Rosal, M.L. (2003). Book review:  Art, science and art therapy by F. Kaplan. Art

Therapy:  Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 20(2), 113.

Rosal, M.L.  (2003). Book review:  Group process made visible by S. Riley.  Art

Therapy:  Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 20(1), 43-44.

Rosal, M.L. (1998).  Research thoughts:  Learning from the literature and from

experience. Art Therapy:  Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 15(1), 47-50.        

Rosal, M.L., McCulloch-Vislisel, S. & Neece, S.  (1997).  Keeping students in school: 

An art therapy program to benefit ninth-grade students.  Art Therapy:  Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 14(1), 30-36.

Pleasant-Metcalf, A., & Rosal, M.L.  (1997).  The use of art therapy to improve academic

performance.  Art Therapy:  Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 14(1), 23-29.

Rosal, M.L.  (1996).  Book review:  Expressive and functional therapies in the treatment

of multiple personality disorder by E.S. Kluft (Ed.).  American Journal of Art

therapy, 34(3), 87-88.

Rosal, M.L.  (1995).  Video Review:  Together we heal:  Mural messages from incest

survivors by F.E. Anderson.  Art Therapy:  Journal of the American Art Therapy

Association, 12(4), 270-271.

Rosal, M.L.  (1995).  Mutual exchange and respect:  A philosophy of art therapy

according to Erika Lehnsen.  American Journal of Art Therapy, 33(3), 69-73.

Rosal, M.L.  (1995).  Book review:  Four books on the process of journaling by L.

Capacchione.  Art Therapy:  Journal of the American Art Therapy Association,

12(1), 76-78.

Rosal, M.L.  (1993).  Comparative group art therapy research to evaluate changes in

locus of control in behavior disordered children.  The Arts in Psychotherapy:  An International Journal, 20, 231-241.

Lusebrink, V.B., Rosal, M.L., & Campanelli, M.  (1993).  Survey of doctoral work by art

therapists.  Art Therapy:  Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 10(4), 226-234.

Malone, S., & Rosal, M.L.  (1993).  Journey toward integration:  The use of collages to

assess the separation and individuation process of an adult identical twin.  Art Therapy:  Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 10(1), 16-22.

Neale, E.L., & Rosal, M.L.  (1993).  What can art therapists learn from the research on

projective drawing techniques for children:  A review of the literature.  The Arts

in Psychotherapy:  An International Journal, 20, 37-49. 

Rosal, M.L.  (1992).  Book review:  Visual perception by N.J. Wade & M. Swanson. 

American Journal of Art Therapy, 31(1), 22.

Rosal, M.L.  (1990).  Book review:  Developing cognitive and creative skills through art: 

Programs for children with communication disorders or learning disabilities (3rd

ed.) by R. Silver.  Art Therapy:  Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 7(3), 142-143.

Rosal, M.L.  (1989).  Master’s papers in art therapy:  Narrative or research case studies? 

The Arts in Psychotherapy:  An International Journal, 16(2), 71-75.

Bowen, C., & Rosal, M.L.  (1989).  The use of art therapy to reduce the maladaptive

behaviors of a mentally retarded adult.  The Arts in Psychotherapy:  An International Journal, 16(3), 211-218.

Phillips, R.A., & Rosal, M.L.  (1989).  Empowering women with PMS through the

creative process.  The Arts in Psychotherapy:  An International Journal, 16(4), 277-282. 

Rosal, M.L.  (1988).  Book review:  Projective techniques for adolescents and children

by A.I. Rabin.  American Journal of Art Therapy, 27(2), 64-65.

Invited Chapters in Published Edited Volumes

Rosal, M.L. (2007).  A comparative analysis of American and British approaches to

group art therapy.  In D. Spring (Ed.), Art in treatment:  Transatlantic dialogue.

Springfield, IL:  Charles C. Thomas.

Rosal, M.L. (2001).  Cognitive-behavioral approaches to art therapy.  In J.A. Rubin (Ed.),

Approaches to Art Therapy (2nd ed.).  New York:  Brunner/Mazel.

Rosal, M.L., Turner-Schikler, L., & Yurt, D.  (1998).  Art therapy with obese teens:  

Racial, cultural and therapeutic implications.  In A.R. Hiscox & A.C. Calisch

(Eds.), Tapestry of cultural issues in art therapy (pp.109-133).  London:  Jessica Kingsley.

Rosal, M.L.  (1993).  The expressive therapies continuum:  The relationship to the arts in

medicine.  In F.J. Bejjani (Ed.), Current research in arts medicine (pp. 111-112). 

Chicago, IL:  A Capella Books.

Lusebrink, V.B, Rosal, M.L., Turner-Schikler, L., Schikler, K., & Ackerman, J.  (1993). 

A brief art therapy intervention with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients.  In F.J. Bejjani (Ed.), Current research in arts medicine (pp. 113-116).  Chicago, IL:  A Capella Books.

Rosal, M.L.  (1992).  Approaches to art therapy with children.  In F.E. Anderson (Ed.),

Art for All the Children (2nd ed.) (pp. 142-183).  Springfield, IL:  Charles C. Thomas.

Rosal, M.L.  (1992).  Illustrations of art therapy research.  In H. Wadeson (Ed.), A Guide

to Conducting Art Therapy Research (pp. 63-72).  Mundelein, IL:  AATA, Inc.

Published Book

Rosal, M.L.  (1996).  Approaches to art therapy with children.  Burlingame, CA: 

Abbeygate Press. (Also translated in Chinese by Liona Lu)

 

Papers Presented

Refereed Papers Presented at International Conferences

Rosal, M.L.  (2004, July). The status of national art therapy associations: An

international perspective.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the Taiwan Art Therapy Association, Taipei.

Rosal, M.L.  (2004, July).  Rethinking and reframing group art therapy.  Paper presented

at the annual conference of the Taiwan Art Therapy Association, Taipei.

Rosal, M.L.  (2004, July).  Using the art museum as a tool in art therapy.  Paper

presented at the 1st annual conference of the Taiwan Art Therapy Association,

Taipei.

Rosal, M.L.  (2004, July).  A model of art therapy for violent clients.  Paper presented at

the 1st annual conference of the Taiwan Art Therapy Association, Taipei.

Rosal, M.L.  (1996, July).  Art therapy with children and adolescents:  An Integrated

Model.  Paper presented at the meeting of National Australia Art Therapy

Association, Sydney, Australia.

Rosal, M.L.  (1992, February).  The expressive therapies continuum:  Relationship to arts

in medicine.  Poster session presented at the MedArt International World Congress on Arts and Medicine, New York, NY.

Lusebrink, V.B, Rosal, M.L., Turner-Schikler, L., Schikler, K., & Ackerman, J.  (1992,

February).  A brief art therapy intervention with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients.  Poster session presented at the MedArt International World Congress on Arts and Medicine, New York, NY.

Rosal, M.L. (1989, September).  Doing art in groups:  A model for group process. 

Paper presented at the meeting Australian National Art Therapy Association, Brisbane, Australia.

Rosal, M.L.  (1989, September).  The expressive therapies continuum:  Applications for

treatment.  Paper presented at the meeting Australian National Art Therapy Association, Brisbane, Australia.

Rosal, M.L.  (1986, November).  Relaxation and imagery in art therapy for behavior

disordered children.  Paper presented at the meeting of the International Imagery Association, San Francisco, CA.

Rosal, M.L.  (1985, September).  Changes in the art of behavior disordered children. 

Paper presented at the 11th Triennial Congress of the International Society for the Study of Art and Psychopathology, London, England.

 

Refereed Papers Presented at National Conferences

Rosal, M.L. (2007, November).  The status of national art therapy associations: a global

perspective. Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Albuquerque, NM.

Rosal, M.L. (2006, November).  Using museum objects for reflection on the meaning of

family. Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, New Orleans, LA.

Rosal, M.L. (2005, November).  Utilizing the art museum as a therapeutic tool.  Paper

presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Atlanta, GA.

Rosal, M.L. (2003, November). A model of art therapy for violent clients.  Paper

presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Chicago, IL.

Rosal, M.L.  (2000, April).  Towards a theory of group art therapy.  Paper presented at

the annual conference of the American Society of Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama, New York, NY.

Rosal, M.L., Deaver, S.H., Julliard, K., Isis, P., & Vick, R.  (1999, November). 

Envisioning a framework for art therapy research:  AATA’s research agenda.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Orlando, FL.

Byers, J., Gerber, N., Hays, R., Linesch, D., & Rosal, M.L.  (1999, November).  Art

therapy education “back to the future”:  A discussion for the millennium.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Orlando, FL.

Rosal, M.L. (1999, November).  Interweaving art therapy into group work.  Paper

presented at the annual conference of the American Counseling Association, San Diego, CA.

Kaplan, F.F., Bloomgarten, J., Knapp, N., Rosal, M.L., & Spaniol, S. (1998, November). 

Research is not a foreign country:  Power and integrity in our own backyard.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Portland, OR.

Rosal, M.L. (1997, November). The art of human rights as a model for personal action. 

Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Milwaukee, WI.

Hartzler, J., & Rosal, M.L. (1997). Developing resiliency in homeless preschool children

through group art therapy.  Poster session presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Milwaukee, WI.

Ohms, M., & Rosal, M.L.  (1997, November).  Increasing internal locus of control and

self-esteem in multiply-diagnosed adolescents.  Poster session presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Milwaukee, WI.

Trowbridge, M., & Rosal, M.L. (1997, November).  Directive versus nondirective art

therapy in the treatment of two traumatized children.  Poster session presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Milwaukee, WI.

Rosal, M.L. & Schikler, L.T. (1996, November).  Art therapy with obese teens: 

Adolescents confront their weight issues.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Philadelphia, PA.

Rosal, M.L., Linesch, D., & Hite, S. (1995, November).  Research in art therapy

education:  A dialogue.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, San Diego, CA.

Rosal, M.L., & Ackerman-Haswell, J. (1995, October).  Group art therapy with special

needs offenders.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the Association for Treatment of Sex Abusers, New Orleans, LA.

Rosal, M.L. (1994, November).  Group art therapy:  What do we know and what do we

still need to consider?  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Chicago, IL.

Rosal, M.L., Ackerman-Haswell, J., & Johnson, L. (1994, November).  Humanity behind

the offense:  Group art therapy with special needs sex offenders.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Chicago, IL.

Ackerman, J., & Rosal, M.L. (1993, November).  The rebels:  Development of an art

therapy group with resistant sex offenders.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Atlanta, GA.

Ising, M.K., & Rosal, M.L.  (1993, November).  Why hast thou forsaken me:  Spiritual

abandonment by victims of war.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Atlanta, GA.

Morgan, J.H., & Rosal, M.L. (1992, November).  Using expressive journals to measure

feelings in an adolescent group.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Las Vegas, NV.

Rosal, M.L. (1991, November).  Liberty and conflict:  Images from psychologists in a

war torn country.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Denver, CO.

Rosal, M.L., Malone, S., & McCulloch-Vislisel. (1989, November).  Heading them off at

the pass:  An expressive therapies program for adolescents.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, San Francisco, CA.

Graves, S.L., Lusebrink, V.B., & Rosal, M.L. (1988, November).  Developmental model

of supervision.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Chicago, IL.

Rosal, M.L., Phillips, R., Menne, K., & Kling, H. (1987, November).  Individual

inquiries:  Single case research in addiction, autism, and multiplicity.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Miami, FL.

Rosal, M.L. (1987, November).  Cognitive approaches in art therapy for children.  Paper

presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Miami, FL.

Rosal, M.L. (1986, November).  The rating of personal construct drawings to measure

behavior change.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Los Angeles, CA.

Rosal, M.L. (1986, November).  Understanding visual language.  Paper presented at the

annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Los Angeles, CA.

Rosal, M.L. (1985, November).  Comparative group art therapy research.   Paper

presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, New Orleans, LA.

Rosal, M.L. (1985, November).  The use of personal construct drawings as an art

therapeutic outcome measure.  Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, New Orleans, LA.

Rosal, M.L. (1985, September).  Conducting research in the arts therapies.  Paper

presented at the annual conference of the Network for Exploring Creativity in Therapy through the Arts, Melbourne, Australia.

Rosal, M.L. (1984, September).  Rhythm and tempi in art therapy.  Paper presented at

the annual conference of the Australian Music Therapy Association, Brisbane, Australia.

Rosal, M.L. (1984, September).  Personal constructs in art.  Paper presented at the

annual conference of the Network for Exploring Creativity in Therapy through the Arts, Brisbane, Australia.

Rosal, M.L. (1983, November).  Locus of control and adaptive behavior in children and

adolescents.   Paper presented at the annual conference of the Australian Research in Education Association, Canberra, Australia.

Rosal, M.L. (1982, November).  The effect of tempo upon form and reflective distance. 

Paper presented at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Philadelphia, PA

Rosal, M.L. (1981, November).  Tempo and rhythm in art therapy.   Paper presented at

the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association, Liberty, NY.


九十七學年客座外籍教授 MARCIA L. ROSAL基本資料

Project Statement

Lecturing/Research Award (#8175) in Taiwan

 

Introduction

 

The Fulbright Scholarship will provide an opportunity to teach art therapy and to conduct qualitative research in Taiwan.  I have an invitation to teach in Taipei at the Taipei Municipal Teacher’s College (TMTC).  The faculty in the art therapy program is eager for additional international faculty to supplement the teaching staff and bring breadth and depth to the course material for the students. 

 

I am familiar with Taipei and previously have made two brief trips to Taiwan.  The first visit was in 1996 as a representative of the Expressive Therapies Program at the University of Louisville (UofL). The UofL faculty was interested in a student/faculty exchange with the Department of Art Education at TMTC. The next visit was during the summer of 2004, the year the Taiwan National Art Therapy Association held its inaugural annual conference.  I was the keynote speaker and also presented a number of other papers during the conference. 

 

The reasons for wanting to return to Taiwan are two-fold.  First, a teaching opportunity in an Asian culture will promote an exchange of ideas and information.  In particular, the opportunity to teach and work with the students and faculty in the art therapy program at TMTC would be enriching. Second, I am eager to research the career decisions of art therapists in a collective culture.

 

Art Therapy

 

Art therapy is a relatively new profession, particularly in Taiwan.  Art therapists assist individuals who have difficulty expressing themselves verbally.  For many people, including children and teens, art is a natural form of expression.  The ease with which numerous populations create drawings illustrating their thoughts and experiences is at the basis for the profession.

 

Art therapy education is intensive and demanding.  There are approximately 40 master’s programs in the US.  TMTC houses the only program in Taiwan.  The number of doctoral-level art therapists is limited and thus, finding qualified educators is difficult. Working with nascent programs around the globe can improve and strengthen art therapy education.

 

Lecturing Component/Contributions to TMTC

 

The TMTC art therapy program first began accepting students during the 2004-2005 academic year.  As often happens, the new degree program began with minimal faculty.  Each year new ways to supplement the teaching staff are explored at TMTC.  The TMTC program requested my assistance for the fall of 2008 (see the TMTC letter of support). As a Fulbright scholar, I will be given the opportunity to teach sections of various art therapy courses during a three month period.  I would be available to advise the TMTC faculty on the program as a whole and make recommendations for curricular revisions. 

 

Courses taught and theses directed. For 24 years I have taught graduate level art therapy courses and have expertise in teaching theories of art therapy, use of media in art therapy, group art therapy, art therapy and psychopathology, understanding symbols in the art of patients, and art therapy research methods.  I have an equal number of years supervising students in internship or practicum. While teaching at UofL, I supervised about 15 master’s theses each year over 14 years.  Since moving to FSU in 1999, I have directed seven students in completing their theses and seven doctoral students in completing their dissertations.

 

Current teaching methods are based on a constructivist approach.  By offering students information presented in a variety of formats, they have the freedom to construct ideas of how to develop their own unique approach to art therapy and style of practice.

 

Curriculum planning experiences. I was involved with curriculum development at both the UofL and the Florida State University (FSU) art therapy programs, particularly in research, group art therapy, and psychopathology. The development of the curriculum for the art therapy program at FSU was done under my direction as was the development of the recently approved MS in Art Therapy degree.

 

Administrative experiences. Administrative roles include current experience as Chairperson of the Department of Art Education and Director of the Art Therapy Program at FSU.  At UofL, administrative positions included Clinical Coordinator for the art therapy program and Director of Research.  I have held numerous administrative posts with the American Art Therapy Association including a term as President.

 

Related research experiences. Art therapy research has been a major focus my career.  Research interests include studies of various populations such as children with various behavior and emotional issues, sex offenders, and individuals with mental retardation.  The use of art therapy for behavior change and the effectiveness of group art therapy are other research interests.  Teaching research methods to art therapy students at various institutions around the US has continued to be a strong interest.

 

Adaptation of teaching style. Teaching in Taipei will be remarkably different than teaching in the US.  In Taipei, students are accustomed to a didactic pedagogical style of learning, whereas in the US, students prefer a discussion and action model of learning.  Asian students tend to come to class more prepared than many US students, and have usually read the material assigned for the class.  This will permit me to bring in information beyond the text and to supplement learning with deeper levels of material.  There will be a translator to assist me with lectures; therefore extra time for translations to occur will be built into lectures.

 

Effect of Fulbright opportunity on professional work. A comparative study of Taiwanese and US art therapy training, practice, and student learning styles will be the result of this award.  Learning about art therapy in an Asian collective cultural context and uncovering how art therapists are perceived in Taiwan is the major goal of this award. 

 

Numerous Asian students are accepted in the FSU Department of Art Education each year. This experience would inform me of additional productive ways to accommodate the learning needs of international students.  Experiencing a different approach to art therapy will broaden my skills as an art therapist and art therapy educator.

 

Preparation for work in Taiwan. As a Hispanic American who has traveled extensively in Central America to visit friends and family, I have become sensitive to cultural differences.  During one visit, in my early teens, I realized that my behavior significantly impacted others.  Since then I have been careful to check my behavior while visiting cultures different than my own, both within the US and when I travel to other parts of the world.  For example, in the early 1980’s, my doctoral studies where conducted in Australia.  There were numerous reminders that personal behavior influences Australians’ perceptions of Americans.  The ability to adapt to Australian cultural norms was rewarded with an invitation to stay for a post-doctoral year. 

 

As a professional I conducted lectures and/or workshops in Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan, Guatemala, and Britain. Invitations to return to these countries continue because of attempts to listen carefully and ask for feedback on how ideas presented could be adapted to the culture the audience serves.

 

Research Component

 

A qualitative study is proposed.  This will be a study of the Taiwanese art therapy students and professionals.  The main objective is to uncover how students and professionals make the decision to become art therapists. I am interested in the participants’ points of view and their reasoning behind this career choice. The purpose of the study is to research how this career decision evolves in a collective culture that does not necessarily value counseling psychology or therapy.  The findings would benefit both the Taiwanese art therapy field and the US art therapy field in that the study may undercover clues on how to justify the art therapy profession to potential students, employers, and patients/clients.

 

The research method would be ethnography where interactions with art therapists and art therapy students over a prolonged period of time can be conducted to understand participant beliefs, motivations, and decisions. Fieldwork would include observing, working with, interacting with, and interviewing the study participants.

 

The research questions are: (1) what factors lead to the decision to become an art therapist, (2) how do the art therapists perceive the value of their work within the Taiwanese culture, (3) how do art therapists think they are perceived by other mental health clinicians, and (4) what is an art therapist’s understanding of how clients, patients and their family members perceive them as art therapists working within the Taiwanese mental health system.

 

Proposed research activities include: (1) obtaining permission from Human Subjects Committees to conduct research; (2) recruiting 4 – 6 individuals to be part of the study, (3) conducting introductory semi-structured interviews with each of the subjects regarding their career choice, (4) observing the students in courses and at internship sites, if possible, (5) writing daily memos about the interactions with the students and personal reactions to observations, (6) analyzing the data for initial findings, and (7) conducting a focus group to verify the initial findings and to uncover other experiences of the participants.  All audiotapes will be transcribed and both the transcripts and memos will be coded to uncover themes and major influences.

 

Professional context.  Taiwan, an Asian country, is a collective culture where familial interdependence is valued (Ho, 1987; Kagitcibasi, 2005). Counselors value independence, even in collective cultures (Mallinckrodt, Shigeoka, & Suzuki, 2005). These opposing forces become evident when Asian individuals seek counseling or therapy.  Individuals seeking therapy in collectivist cultures and who value interdependence may be encouraged to put themselves above family (Kagitcibasi, 2005).  Thus, in collective cultures, therapy values may conflict with cultural and familial values (Leong, Wagner, & Tata, 1995).  Due to this conflict, it may be difficult for individuals to make the decision to seek therapy.

 

Therefore, making a career choice in a counseling profession such as art therapy must be difficult in a collective culture (Henderson & Chan, 2005; Leong, Kao, & Lee, 2004).  Yet each year numerous students apply for the art therapy program at TMTC.  The proposed research may illuminate the decision-making process of art therapists and uncover the conflicts students need to resolve prior to making the commitment to such a career.

 

Teaching and professional experience related to research. Interacting with students who make career decisions is commonplace in graduate art therapy programs.  Even in the US, the decision to study art therapy as opposed to counseling or social work or even business or law demands that students examine core beliefs and life goals.  In the US, art therapy students are optimistic about their career choice. The relative novelty of art therapy as a new field within mental health arena does not dampen their excitement. To uncover the career decision struggles of Taiwanese students and to compare their experience with US students would better inform art therapy advisors and faculty members of career decision models.  This information may aid in the development of best practices for working with students trying to make these tough decisions.

 

Significance of the project.  The research will contribute to the field of art therapy and counseling psychology in both Taiwanese and US cultures.  In general, the field will benefit from understanding how the decision to pursue a career in art therapy is made.  The decision to become an art therapist in Taiwanese culture will assist the program at TMTC in developing programmatic materials that highlight the reasons to be practice art therapy in that culture.  Specifically, uncovering any cultural influences that affect art therapy career choices would be most beneficial to the profession.

 

Rationale for residency in Taiwan.  The research cannot be done without being immersed in the culture being studied (Taiwan or alternatively, another Asian country).  When conducting an ethnographic study, a researcher needs to be situated in the culture of the participants and observe them in their native surroundings.

 

TMTC has classrooms that are designated for the art therapy students.  I will have access to the classrooms and will be able to observe them in the classroom environment.  I will have access to the classrooms when not in use to conduct interviews and group meetings. Although there is a shortage of office space, use of a faculty office can be arranged when individual interviews are conducted. 

 

Affiliation & project completion. The Department of Art Education at TMTC, which houses the graduate art therapy program, has invited me to be a visiting lecturer and they understand that research will be conducted during the time there (see the TMTC letter of support).  The plan is for a three month residency at TMTC.  This is adequate time to conduct the necessary fieldwork for the research.  During the first couple week of residency, participants for the study will be recruited.  During the next several weeks, interactive observations and interviews of the students will take place.  During the final weeks of the project, at least one focus group will be arranged to gather final information and test the preliminary findings of the study.  .

 

Language/Translator.  Although the lecturing will be in English and Taiwanese students are proficient in English, a translator for the interviews and the focus groups will be arranged.  Participants will then be able to speak in their native tongue.  The translator will also transcribe audiotapes of interviews and focus groups.

 

Dissemination of study results. Once the information is analyzed, a manuscript for publication will be prepared and a paper will be developed for presentation at a national conference of the American Art Therapy Association.  A manuscript to Dr. Liona Lu at TMTC and she will co-author an article for publication in Taiwan.

 

Lecture topics. This request is for a Lecturing/Research Award.  In addition to the teaching responsibilities assigned by TMTC, I am open to lecturing on topics related to my research including conducting research in the field of art therapy, the differences between qualitative and quantitative research in art therapy, and the historical aspect of art therapy research in the US.

 

Preparation for work in Taiwan. As mentioned above under the lecturing section of this essay, I have traveled extensively and have had two previous visits to Taiwan.  I studied for three years in Australia and have traveled to several other countries around the world.  Prior to living in Taiwan, I will research more about the history and culture of the country and will attempt to learn some Chinese.

 

 

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